Steven Meisel’s ‘Make Love Not War’ for Italian Vogue

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American fashion photographer Steven Meisel recently did a campaign for Italian Vogue titled, “Make Love Not War,” in which he depicts sweaty, dirty soldiers in the middle of a war-zone interacting with models in a very “heated fashion.” More than 60 people including models, make up artists, stylists, and hairdressers collaborated to put this set together.

More images after the jump.

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2 Comments
  • Erasmus

    To all the critics,

    Context is everything. Does the title: “Make Love Not War” mean nothing to you? Does it not set the context? I see a lot of prudish people, who see nakedness as sinful, assuming a far different context and criticizing this series as sleez used to glamorize war. It was as obvious as day to me that there is a far deeper statement here. One that resonates with the peace movement of the ’60’s from where the title originates. Consider that some of the most violence cultures are also the most repressed, where women are wrapped from head to toe. If you really look deeply at each photograph in the series, rather than skimming through it and reacting impulsively to bared nipples (DEAR GOD NO!!), you will see tools for death and destruction (ie soldiers) reshaped into peaceful fun-loving human beings. Nothing obscene or graphic is even occurring. Just camaraderie between men and women. Friendships. A soft kiss here. A shared look. The power of love triumphs over hate/war.
    If only all the soldiers of war on both sides of the battlefield could be given the choice between love and war.

    May 3, 2009 at 6:51 pm
  • Erasmus

    To all the critics,

    Context is everything. Does the title: “Make Love Not War” mean nothing to you? Does it not set the context? I see a lot of prudish people, who see nakedness as sinful, assuming a far different context and criticizing this series as sleez used to glamorize war. It was as obvious as day to me that there is a far deeper statement here. One that resonates with the peace movement of the ’60’s from where the title originates. Consider that some of the most violence cultures are also the most repressed, where women are wrapped from head to toe. If you really look deeply at each photograph in the series, rather than skimming through it and reacting impulsively to bared nipples (DEAR GOD NO!!), you will see tools for death and destruction (ie soldiers) reshaped into peaceful fun-loving human beings. Nothing obscene or graphic is even occurring. Just camaraderie between men and women. Friendships. A soft kiss here. A shared look. The power of love triumphs over hate/war.
    If only all the soldiers of war on both sides of the battlefield could be given the choice between love and war.

    May 3, 2009 at 6:51 pm